World: Abducted Nigerian college students freed

The sheikh, the ransom payments and the bandits

  The sheikh, the ransom payments and the bandits A Muslim cleric in northern Nigeria is in the eye of the storm for his part in the country's kidnap crisis.Sheikh Ahmad Gumi, a former army captain, was involved in Wednesday's release of 27 students abducted in March from a forestry college in Nigeria's Kaduna state.

Nearly 30 abducted Nigerian college students have been freed, a local official said on Wednesday, two months after heavily armed gunmen kidnapped them from their campus in the north of the country.

a person riding a bike down a dirt road: Soldiers battled with gunmen when they took students from the college © Bosan Yakusak Soldiers battled with gunmen when they took students from the college

The abduction of the students from a college of forestry mechanization in Kaduna state in March was one of a series of mass kidnappings to hit schools and universities in Nigeria since late last year.

Ten of the 39 students initially kidnapped were found by security forces in the weeks following the attack. But the whereabouts of the remaining 29 had been uncertain.

Nigerian kidnap kingpin reneges on amnesty deal

  Nigerian kidnap kingpin reneges on amnesty deal A Nigerian bandit chief who led the kidnapping of hundreds of schoolchildren before accepting an amnesty deal has reneged on the peace accord with authorities and returned to crime, sources told AFP. Awwalun Daudawa commanded the abduction of more than 500 students from Government Science Secondary School in northwestern Kankara state last December before handing himself in to authorities. His rejection of the amnesty underscores the complexity of engaging with Nigeria's criminal gangs, setting back efforts to end attacks and kidnappings plaguing the country's northwest.

"The Kaduna State Police Command has reported to the Kaduna State Government, the release of the remaining students of the Federal College of Forestry Mechanization," local state security official Samuel Aruwan said in a statement.

a group of people holding a sign: Parents and relatives of students the Kaduna college protested outside the parliament to demand their rescue © Kola Sulaimon Parents and relatives of students the Kaduna college protested outside the parliament to demand their rescue

The statement did not give any details about how the students were released or their condition.

During the March attack in Kaduna state, the military had managed to rescue 180 other students on the outskirts of the state capital, Kaduna city, after a firefight with the gunmen.

Heavily armed criminal gangs have become an increasing security threat in northwest and central Nigeria, pillaging villages, raiding cattle and kidnapping for ransom.

fear of a new Jihadist fireplace in Niger, according to ICG

 fear of a new Jihadist fireplace in Niger, according to ICG © Issouf Sanogo A patrol of Nigerian soldiers at the airport of Diffa, in the south-east of Niger, near the Nigeria border, the 23rd December 2020 A third jihadist home could be born in southwestern Niger, theater of a violent banditry from neighboring Nigeria and community tensions, which could exploit jihadist groups to establish their influence in this area, said Thursday. International Crisis Group thinking center (ICG).

Recently they have turned their focus to rural schools and universities, where they kidnap students or schoolchildren.

Kidnap victims are usually released shortly after during negotiations with local authorities, though state officials always deny that any ransom payments are made.

Mass kidnappings in the northwest are complicating challenges facing President Muhammadu Buhari's security forces, who are also battling a more than decade-long Islamist insurgency in the northeast.

News of the Kaduna releases came just days after a bandit chief who led the kidnapping of hundreds of schoolchildren last year was killed in armed clashes with a rival gang.

He had returned to his gang after reneging on an amnesty deal with local government authorities, sources said, illustrating the complex task officials face dealing with armed groups known locally as "bandits".

Last month, gunmen attacked a private university also in Kaduna state, killing one staff member and kidnapping about 20 students and workers, staff said.

Local authorities said five of the kidnapped students from that attack on Greenfield University in Kaduna were killed by gunmen and their bodies found nearby.

Recent mass kidnappings have prompted six northern Nigerian states to shut public schools to prevent further attacks on students.

amu/pma/kjl/har

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