Health & Fitness: People waiting for first jab are NOT put off by blood clot fears

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  Covid vaccine side effects: Thrombosis reported in patients - what is it? COVID vaccine side effects: Thrombosis relates to blood clots which can be deadly and has been reported by people in Austria after having the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine. Why would this occur?Thrombosis occurs when blood clots block your blood vessels, explained John Hopkins Medicine.

Isobel Morrice et al. posing for the camera: MailOnline logo © Provided by Daily Mail MailOnline logo

People waiting for their first Covid vaccine say they are not put off by blood clot fears - and insist they would still be happy to have AstraZeneca shot.

A review by the drugs watchdog the MHRA found that by the end of March, 79 out of 20million Britons vaccinated with the AstraZeneca vaccine had suffered blood clots in the brain or arteries, a rate of about one in 250,000.

Nineteen of the cases died and three were under the age of 30.

UK health chiefs today said Britons under 30 should be offered an alternative to AstraZeneca's coronavirus vaccine while experts investigate the link.

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A press conference tonight announced the change in guidance - and stated that younger people are more prone to blood clots after vaccination than older groups.

But concerns about the highly-rare clots have done nothing to deter those waiting for their first dose.

Here, Britons tell MailOnline how they would 'snap someone's hand off for the vaccine' - while others said they 'trust the scientists who say it's safe'.

David Coursey, 38, management consultant in Bristol

David Coursey, 38, said: 'I'd definitely still take it.

'If you look at the number of people who have had the vaccine, versus those who have been ill because of it, it's very marginal. Hardly anyone has been badly affected by it.

'My parents have had the AstraZeneca one and I know some of my friends parents have, and they've been fine.

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'So I'd take my chances. I'm young and pretty healthy so I think the chances of it affecting me are very slim.'

a man that is standing in the grass: David Coursey, 38, said: 'I'd definitely still take it. 'If you look at the number of people who have had the vaccine, versus those who have been ill because of it, it's very marginal. Hardly anyone has been badly affected by it' © Provided by Daily Mail David Coursey, 38, said: 'I'd definitely still take it. 'If you look at the number of people who have had the vaccine, versus those who have been ill because of it, it's very marginal. Hardly anyone has been badly affected by it'

Dominic Core, 45, chef in Bristol

Dominic Core, 45, added: 'I wouldn't be put off one little bit.

'I think there's a risk with taking any drugs. Even if the wrong person took paracetamol it could have bad side effects.

'So no, it doesn't bother me one bit.

'I have a feeling I'm going to be given the Moderna one, because of the age group I'm in.

'But I wouldn't give it a second thought about having any of the vaccines.'

a person in a green jacket talking on a cell phone: Dominic Core, 45, (pictured) added: 'I wouldn't be put off one little bit. 'I think there's a risk with taking any drugs. Even if the wrong person took paracetamol it could have bad side effects' © Provided by Daily Mail Dominic Core, 45, (pictured) added: 'I wouldn't be put off one little bit. 'I think there's a risk with taking any drugs. Even if the wrong person took paracetamol it could have bad side effects'

Carmen Horton, 24, accountant in Bristol

Carmen Horton, 24, said she would still have the AstraZeneca vaccine.

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She added: 'I think there has been a lot of scaremongering about it, but I don't really take that to heart.

'It's something that I'd look into myself and discuss with my doctor.

'But it looks like it's the same risk, if not lower, of getting a clot from the vaccine as just getting it normally.

'And they still put women on birth control, and that comes with a lot higher risk of a blood clot. So I'm not too bothered by it.'

a person sitting on a bench: Carmen Horton, 24, (pictured) said she would still have the AstraZeneca vaccine © Provided by Daily Mail Carmen Horton, 24, (pictured) said she would still have the AstraZeneca vaccine

Millie Paine, 24, student in Bristol

Millie Paine, 24, said: 'I would still take it.

'I think the chances that you will get a blood clot are way lower than your chances of getting Covid and dying from that.

'And also, as far as I'm aware, there is not an established causal link between the two things.

'It just seems like the benefits would outweigh the risks.'

a woman wearing a blue jacket: Millie Paine, 24, said: 'I would still take it. I think the chances that you will get a blood clot are way lower than your chances of getting Covid and dying from that' © Provided by Daily Mail Millie Paine, 24, said: 'I would still take it. I think the chances that you will get a blood clot are way lower than your chances of getting Covid and dying from that'

Zack Osborn, 28, chef in Bristol

Zack Osborn, 28, said he would also still have the AstraZeneca vaccine.

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He said: 'I think it's just a game of numbers, if you look at the sheer number of people who have had the AstraZeneca vaccine, and those who have actually had bad side effects.

'I think you'll find side effects with any large-scale output like this, especially when it's been done on short notice.

'I think it's interesting that they've stopped trialling the vaccine on children for the time being while they investigate the possible links to blood clots.

'But for me personally, if I was offered it, I would just take it. It's definitely a step forward.'

a man that is standing in the grass: Zack Osborn, 28, (pictured) said he would also still have the AstraZeneca vaccine © Provided by Daily Mail Zack Osborn, 28, (pictured) said he would also still have the AstraZeneca vaccine

Janek Borkowski, 26, works in PR in Bristol

Janek Borkowski, 26, said he was not put off by the Oxford vaccine's potential links to blood clots.

He said: 'I don't really have a problem with it.

'The scientific opinion I have seen and read seems to suggest it's something like a one in 60,000 chance of getting a clot.

'And I heard one scientist say that you're less likely to get a blood clot from the vaccine than you are normally.

'So I would still have the vaccine.'

a man wearing glasses and smiling at the camera: Janek Borkowski, 26, said he was not put off by the Oxford vaccine's potential links to blood clots © Provided by Daily Mail Janek Borkowski, 26, said he was not put off by the Oxford vaccine's potential links to blood clots

Freya George, 21, retail worker from Leeds.

Freya George, 21, said: 'I'd definitely take it if it was offered to me. I don't know much about it but I trust the scientists who say it's safe.

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'I don't really know I think I'd research it more if I got offered the vaccine but I don't think I'd not take it.

'The positives outweigh the negatives.'

Nathan Swaine, 19, software developer from Leeds

Nathan Swaine, 19, said: 'I think it's better to have the vaccine than not.'We have a higher chance of dying from Covid and spreading it than we do from the vaccine.

'I feel it's safe and I'd definitely take it if it was offered to me.'

Rebecca Brown, 26, nail technician from Leeds

Rebecca Brown, 26, said: 'I don't think I'd hesitate to take the vaccine if it was offered to me.

'I'd be more than happy.

'Women have a bigger risk of getting a blood clot from taking the contraceptive pill than we'd have from taking the vaccine.

'I trust the testing and feel confident it's safe.'

Abi Yerrill, 20, student from Leeds

Abi Yerrill, 20, said: 'I'd definitely still take the vaccine if it was offered to me.

'We're better off with it than without even if there are risks.'It's a concern for sure and it's worth noting it and looking into.

'But the positives far outweigh the negatives.'I also really want to get out this summer.'

Erin Ritchie, 21, baker from Leeds

Erin Ritchie, 21, said: 'I just really want to be able to go out and enjoy the pub with my mates.

'I think the vaccine is safe and I'd take it the moment it's offered.'I'm not concerned that it's unsafe. There are always risks with everything but they're not big enough for it to make me decide against it.'

a person holding a bag and walking on a city street: Erin Ritchie, 21, said: 'I just really want to be able to go out and enjoy the pub with my mates' © Provided by Daily Mail Erin Ritchie, 21, said: 'I just really want to be able to go out and enjoy the pub with my mates'

Will Lewis, 20, student from Leeds

Will Lewis, 20, said: 'I'd take the vaccine as soon as it's offered even if there's a link between it and clotting.

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'We need to protect ourselves and others and the vaccine is the best way to do that.

'There are always risks but we take far bigger risks than this vaccine poses all the time.

'And I think we're all ready to go out and do things without worrying about infecting others or getting infected ourselves.'

a man holding a bag and walking on a city street: Will Lewis, 20, said: 'I'd take the vaccine as soon as it's offered even if there's a link between it and clotting' © Provided by Daily Mail Will Lewis, 20, said: 'I'd take the vaccine as soon as it's offered even if there's a link between it and clotting'

Ben Barkworth, 26, content editor from Leeds

Ben Barkworth, 26, said: 'I would have taken the vaccine if it was offered, it's still good generally for us to get vaccinated to get over the pandemic.

'If I was offered an alternative vaccine I would take that, but I don't think the AZ vaccine is so harmful that I would avoid it entirely.

'Blood clotting is concerning, but the numbers are quite minimal.

'If they're telling us we shouldn't take it I would take that information on and I would avoid it. But it's tough to say.

'If they're suggesting we get other vaccines I'll wait for that.

'I'm still confident in the vaccines, AZ or otherwise, and I think it's still better that we get it.

'It's a tough one but I think it's best for everyone to get vaccinated.

'The benefits need to outweigh the negatives, and I think they do.'

Terry Ashby, 29, artist from Leeds

Terry Ashby said: 'I'd snap someone's hand off for the vaccine. I've read the stats, the numbers seem small and the chances of falling ill are low.

'I know it's a possibility, but with any vaccine there's always a chance people react badly.

'I personally would take my chances.

'If I was giving the option of AZ or another I would choose another, but if I was just given that option I wouldn't mind.

'I think that holding a press conference about it does raise concerns, but when you actually look at the numbers as I have done there is not much to worry about.

'As far as I can tell why they are stopping the jab for the under 30s is because there is a slight chance you'll be ill. I'm not that worried.'

Phoebe Scott, 23, student from Leeds

Phoebe Scott, 23, said: 'I'm not too concerned about the clotting, as someone who has been on the pill I know the risk there is much worse and that's never really focused on. I think it'll be fine.

'If I was offered the AZ vaccine and it was the only choice I would take it.

'To be honest, even with the new advice, it wouldn't deter me. I would still take whichever vaccine is given to me first.

'I just want to see my family and friends again, and I'm ready.'

Shane Conlan, 29, bricklayer from Leeds

Father-of-two Shane Conlan said: 'I think I still feel safe because it's been approved and we know there are risks but they're not enough for me to feel uncomfortable or unsafe.

'I wasn't too worried about it but I'll have to read up more because the press conference is obviously concerning.

'But with the blood clotting, for what I understand, women have had a chance of getting that from taking the pill and that's something they do every day.

'If I can avoid taking the AZ vaccine I might do now especially if an alternative is available, but I would probably still take it if it was offered.

'As long as the risks remain as minuscule as I believe it is at the time.'

Read more

Mother, 47, dies after AstraZeneca Covid jab caused blood clots .
Lucy Taberer, 47, from Aylestone, Leicester, fell seriously ill after getting the AstraZeneca jab and developed blood clots on her brain which caused a massive stroke. Her heartbroken fiance Mark Tomlin, from Aylestone, Leicester, has since spoken about the devastating impact her death has had on the family including the couple's five-year-old son Orson.He said Lucy, a playgroup leader, initially experienced mild and common side effects in the days after she was vaccinated at the Peepul Centre in Belgrave on March 19.

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