World: At NATO, Turkey hails its revival of dialogue with Greece

Greece says many migrants in Turkey could seek asylum there

  Greece says many migrants in Turkey could seek asylum there ATHENS, Greece (AP) — Greece on Monday designated neighboring Turkey as a safe country in which to seek international protection for the majority of asylum-seekers departing its shores for Greece. A joint decree from the Greek foreign and migration ministries said the designation applies to asylum-seekers from Syria, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Somalia. It said Turkey meets all criteria to examine asylum requests from these nationals, as there "they are not in any danger ... due to their race, religion, citizenship, political beliefs or membership in some particular social group, and can seek asylum in Turkey instead of in Greece.

BRUSSELS (AP) — Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who is vying to mend Turkey’s battered relations with its Western partners, said Monday that a revival of dialogue with fellow NATO member Greece to resolve long-standing disputes will serve “stability and prosperity” in the region.

U.S. President Joe Biden, right, is greeted by Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, center, during a plenary session at a NATO summit in Brussels, Monday, June 14, 2021. U.S. President Joe Biden is taking part in his first NATO summit, where the 30-nation alliance hopes to reaffirm its unity and discuss increasingly tense relations with China and Russia, as the organization pulls its troops out after 18 years in Afghanistan. (AP Photo/Olivier Matthys, Pool) © Provided by Associated Press U.S. President Joe Biden, right, is greeted by Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, center, during a plenary session at a NATO summit in Brussels, Monday, June 14, 2021. U.S. President Joe Biden is taking part in his first NATO summit, where the 30-nation alliance hopes to reaffirm its unity and discuss increasingly tense relations with China and Russia, as the organization pulls its troops out after 18 years in Afghanistan. (AP Photo/Olivier Matthys, Pool) NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, left, greets Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan as he arrives for a NATO summit at NATO headquarters in Brussels, Monday, June 14, 2021. U.S. President Joe Biden is taking part in his first NATO summit, where the 30-nation alliance hopes to reaffirm its unity and discuss increasingly tense relations with China and Russia, as the organization pulls its troops out after 18 years in Afghanistan. (Kenzo Tribouillard, Pool via AP) © Provided by Associated Press NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, left, greets Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan as he arrives for a NATO summit at NATO headquarters in Brussels, Monday, June 14, 2021. U.S. President Joe Biden is taking part in his first NATO summit, where the 30-nation alliance hopes to reaffirm its unity and discuss increasingly tense relations with China and Russia, as the organization pulls its troops out after 18 years in Afghanistan. (Kenzo Tribouillard, Pool via AP)

Speaking on the sidelines of a NATO summit, Erdogan also lamented what he said was a lack of support by Turkey’s NATO allies in its fight against terrorism. It was a veiled reference to Turkey’s disappointment with U.S. military support for Syrian Kurdish fighters, who Ankara argues are inextricably linked to a decades-long Kurdish insurgency in Turkey.

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Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan attends a plenary session during a NATO summit at NATO headquarters in Brussels, Monday, June 14, 2021. U.S. President Joe Biden is taking part in his first NATO summit, where the 30-nation alliance hopes to reaffirm its unity and discuss increasingly tense relations with China and Russia, as the organization pulls its troops out after 18 years in Afghanistan. (Brendan Smialowski, Pool via AP) © Provided by Associated Press Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan attends a plenary session during a NATO summit at NATO headquarters in Brussels, Monday, June 14, 2021. U.S. President Joe Biden is taking part in his first NATO summit, where the 30-nation alliance hopes to reaffirm its unity and discuss increasingly tense relations with China and Russia, as the organization pulls its troops out after 18 years in Afghanistan. (Brendan Smialowski, Pool via AP)

Erdogan is holding a series of one-on-one meetings with NATO leaders, including U.S. President Joe Biden. The Turkish strongman has recently toned down his anti-Western rhetoric as he seeks foreign investments for his country, which has been troubled by a currency crisis and an economic downturn made worse by the coronavirus pandemic.

Biden aims to bolster troubled Turkey ties in first Erdoğan meeting

  Biden aims to bolster troubled Turkey ties in first Erdoğan meeting President Biden and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan are heading into their first face-to-face meeting in Brussels with the goal of stabilizing a necessary but troubled relationship.Washington and Ankara are strategic partners in global affairs and will meet on the sidelines of the NATO summit on Monday, but they have long-standing tensions over a host of geopolitical issues.At the top is Turkey's possession of the Russian S-400 missile defense system, a key point of conflict with its NATO ally members.

“Turkey is on the frontline in the fight against terrorism in all relevant international platforms, especially NATO,” Erdogan said, adding that some 4,000 Islamic State group fighters were “neutralized” in Turkish cross border operations.

“Turkey is the only NATO ally which has fought face-to-face and gave its young sons as martyrs for this cause,” Erdogan said. “Unfortunately, we did not receive the support and solidarity we expected from our allies and partners in our fight against all forms of terrorism.”

Last summer, a long-standing dispute between Turkey and Greece over boundaries and rights to natural resources in the eastern Mediterranean flared anew after Ankara sent research vessels into waters where Greece asserts jurisdiction.

Diplomats from the two countries have held two rounds of talks in recent months for the first time in five years, while the foreign ministers of Greece and Turkey also held reciprocal visits.

Biden at NATO for bridge building after Trump mocked alliance as 'obsolete'

  Biden at NATO for bridge building after Trump mocked alliance as 'obsolete' Biden is attending his first NATO meeting as president, aiming to build bridges after Trump berated allies as 'deadbeats' and belittled the alliance.The only time that the Article 5 provision was invoked was when NATO member states rushed to support the United States after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. But Trump, who once branded NATO "obsolete," wondered out loud why he should send U.S. troops to defend countries he apparently had barely heard of.

“I believe that reviving the channels of dialogue between (Turkey) and our neighbor and ally, Greece, and the resolution of bilateral issues will ... serve the stability and prosperity of our region,” Erdogan said, in a video address to a think tank event on the sidelines of the summit.

Erdogan’s talks with Biden are expected to focus on U.S. support for Syrian Kurdish fighters, as well as a dispute over Ankara’s acquisition of a Russian air defense system, which led to Turkey being removed from the F-35 fighter program and sanctions on defense industry officials.

NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, right, greets Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan as he arrives for a NATO summit at NATO headquarters in Brussels, Monday, June 14, 2021. U.S. President Joe Biden is taking part in his first NATO summit, where the 30-nation alliance hopes to reaffirm its unity and discuss increasingly tense relations with China and Russia, as the organization pulls its troops out after 18 years in Afghanistan. (Kenzo Tribouillard, Pool via AP) © Provided by Associated Press NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, right, greets Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan as he arrives for a NATO summit at NATO headquarters in Brussels, Monday, June 14, 2021. U.S. President Joe Biden is taking part in his first NATO summit, where the 30-nation alliance hopes to reaffirm its unity and discuss increasingly tense relations with China and Russia, as the organization pulls its troops out after 18 years in Afghanistan. (Kenzo Tribouillard, Pool via AP)

Washington says the S-400 missiles, which Turkey purchased in 2019, pose a threat to NATO’s integrated air defense and has demanded that Ankara abandons the $2.5 billion system.

Overnight Defense: Biden participates in NATO summit | White House backs 2002 AUMF repeal | Top general says no plans for airstrikes to help Afghan forces after withdrawal

  Overnight Defense: Biden participates in NATO summit | White House backs 2002 AUMF repeal | Top general says no plans for airstrikes to help Afghan forces after withdrawal Happy Monday and welcome to Overnight Defense. I'm Rebecca Kheel, and here's your nightly guide to the latest developments at the Pentagon, on Capitol Hill and beyond. CLICK HERE to subscribe to the newsletter.THE TOPLINE: President Biden was in Brussels on Monday for his first NATO summit since taking office.Upon arriving, Biden touted the "sacred obligation" of NATO's mutual defense commitment, known as Article 5."NATO is criticallyTHE TOPLINE: President Biden was in Brussels on Monday for his first NATO summit since taking office.

In April, Biden infuriated Ankara by declaring that the Ottoman-era mass killing and deportations of Armenians was “genocide.” Turkey denies that the deportations and massacres that began in 1915 and killed an estimated 1.5 million Armenians amounted to genocide.

Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, center left, greets U.S. President Joe Biden, center right, during a plenary session during a NATO summit at NATO headquarters in Brussels, Monday, June 14, 2021. U.S. President Joe Biden is taking part in his first NATO summit, where the 30-nation alliance hopes to reaffirm its unity and discuss increasingly tense relations with China and Russia, as the organization pulls its troops out after 18 years in Afghanistan. (Brendan Smialowski, Pool via AP) © Provided by Associated Press Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, center left, greets U.S. President Joe Biden, center right, during a plenary session during a NATO summit at NATO headquarters in Brussels, Monday, June 14, 2021. U.S. President Joe Biden is taking part in his first NATO summit, where the 30-nation alliance hopes to reaffirm its unity and discuss increasingly tense relations with China and Russia, as the organization pulls its troops out after 18 years in Afghanistan. (Brendan Smialowski, Pool via AP)

In Brussels, Erdogan met with French President Emmanuel Macron, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis.

After his meeting with Erdogan, Macron tweeted that he wants to “move forward” with Turkey.

It was their first meeting since a dispute between the two countries reached its peak in October, after Erdogan questioned Macron’s mental health.

Both men discussed Libya and Syria issues, the Elysee said. Macron has accused Turkey of flouting its commitments by ramping up its military presence in Libya and bringing in jihadi fighters from Syria.

Behind-the-scenes disputes point to trust gap between Biden and 'troublemaker' France .
BRUSSELS AND GENEVA — President Joe Biden took office on a mission to rehabilitate the country's ties with Western Europe after the acrimony of former President Donald Trump’s tenure and rally the world’s leading democracies to counter a predatory Chinese Communist regime. © Provided by Washington Examiner A week of transatlantic pageantry showed signs of progress on both fronts, but U.S. and European sources acknowledge a tension between those two goals.

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